Fleur-de-lis – Window 1
The Christian Year begins with the fourth Sunday before Christmas, called the First
Sunday in Advent. Advent means “coming,” and it is the season in which we
commemorate the long preparation for the coming of the Christ, which is the theme of the
Old Testament, and our Christian hope that Christ will come again “to judge the quick and
the dead.” The Fleur-de-lis (Window 1) is a symbol of the royalty of the One who comes
and the purity of the Virgin Mary.
Nativity Rose – Window 2
At the climax of Advent comes Christmas, on which we commemorate the birth of our Lord
in Bethlehem. The Nativity Rose (Window 2) is an ancient symbol of Christ’s birth.
Star – Window 3
The thirteenth day after Christmas is called Epiphany, from the Greek word meaning “to
symbolized by the Star (Window 3), and celebrate the manifestation of Jesus to the
Gentiles.
The Palms – Window 4
Lent, from the Anglo-Saxon word lencten, meaning spring, begins on Ash Wednesday,
which is forty days, excluding Sundays before Easter.  The final week of Lent, called Holy
Week, begins with Palm Sunday. On this day we commemorate Jesus’ tragic-triumphant
entry into Jerusalem to meet death at the hands of his enemies. The Palms (Window 4)
represent this day.
Crown of Thorns – Window 5
On Maundy Thursday of Holy Week (the name is from the Latin, mandatum novum, “a
new commandment give I unto you”) we recall the institution of the Sacrament of Holy
Communion on the night on which Jesus was betrayed. On Good Friday we remember the
crucifixion of the Son of God, represented by the Crown of Thorns (Window 5) The initials
I.N.R.I. in the crown stand for Jesus Nazarenus Rex ludaeorum, “Jesus of Nazareth, King
of the Jews” (John 19:19)
Lily – Window 6
The resurrection of Jesus Christ from the dead is celebrated on Easter. The glorious
victory of this joyous day is symbolized by the Lily (Window 6) Forty days after Easter we
celebrate our Lord’s Exaltation to the right hand of God on Ascension Day. The Chariot of
Fire (Window 7), in which Elijah was taken up into heaven (2 Kings 2:11), is an ancient
symbol of the Ascension.
Chariot – Window 7
The resurrection of Jesus Christ from the dead is celebrated on Easter. The glorious
victory of this joyous day is symbolized by the Lily (Window 6) Forty days after Easter we
celebrate our Lord’s Exaltation to the right hand of God on Ascension Day. The Chariot of
Fire (Window 7), in which Elijah was taken up into heaven (2 Kings 2:11), is an ancient
symbol of the Ascension.
Dove – Window 8
Ten days after the Ascension we celebrate Pentecost Sunday, sometimes called
Whitsunday (White Sunday),  because of the white robes of the candidates for baptism on
this day in the early church. Pentecost was an ancient Jewish festival. On the Day of
Pentecost following the Ascension of Jesus, the Holy Spirit descended on the Church
(Acts 2). At this time we remember both the gift of the Holy Spirit and the birth of the
Christian Church. The Dove (Window 8) is a Biblical symbol of the Holy Spirit (Mark 1:10).
Trefoil – Window 9
The Sunday after Pentecost is called Trinity. On this day we are reminded of our Christian
doctrine of One God in three persons, Father, Son, and Holy Spirit. The Trefoil (Window
9) symbolizes the Trinity.
Crown – Window 10
All Saints’ Day (November 1) was not observed by the early Reformers because of its
Romanish associations, but it is being increasingly realized by Reformed and Presbyterian
congregations that it is a right and fitting thing for the Church to remember gratefully and
lovingly before God those who have loved and served Him in his church on earth and
have been gathered to his promised rest. On this day we emphasize our belief in “the
communion of the saints” and “the life everlasting.” Memorial services in Protestant
churches are often held on the first Sunday in November. The Crown (Window 10)
represents the gift of eternal life to those faithful unto death (Rev 2:10).
Cup, Grapes, Grain, and Dove – Front of Church
The stained glass window at the front of the sanctuary was installed when the building was
constructed, and was dedicated to the glory of God in memory of Mrs. J.D. McCloy, Sr., on
October 14, 1956. The central figure in the window is a Chalice or Communion Cup
containing ears of grain and bunches of grapes, symbols of the bread and wine of the
Sacrament. The crosses in the side portions of the window are Latin Crosses. The
descending Dove at the very top of the window is a symbol of the Holy Spirit, the Lord and
Life-Giver of the church.
of the
First Presbyterian Church
Information taken from an article written by George A. Chauncey in 1958.